The Rose Home: Experience In Recovery

The Rose Home in Syracuse houses women who have drug and alcohol issues. The home currently houses four women and is run by director Christina Blackshire. (Photo by Phoebe Muthart)

The Rose Home in Syracuse houses women who have drug and alcohol issues. The home currently houses four women and is run by director Christina Blackshire. (Photo by Phoebe Muthart)

The Rose Home is a place for women who are struggling with drug and alcohol problems. Currently, there are four women in the home, but the house can accommodate up to 10 women.

It is a women’s residential recovery home located in Syracuse.

“Our residents are women who are in recovery from drug and alcohol addiction, who have made the decision to find help for themselves to learn a new way of living,” said Bob Wolfe, a member of the board of directors. “The Rose Home is a facility for achieving recovery and provides a safe environment with recovery meetings and fellowship in a community established on Christian values, especially to extend a helping hand to those who can no longer help themselves.”

The Rose Home house and the 17 acres it sets on were donated to the Fort Wayne based corporation and the facility was opened in Syracuse in 2006. The local facility is known as Rose Home North.

Christine Blackshire is the director of The Rose Home North in Syracuse. (Phoebe Muthart)

Christine Blackshire is the director of The Rose Home North in Syracuse. (Phoebe Muthart)

Director of the Rose Home, Christine Blackshire, said the house is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week. There are five levels to the program, which is a holistic approach to recovery. The levels are designed for women’s needs rather than men’s needs, which are different, explained Blackshire.

“We address their spiritual needs,” said Blackshire. “We address issues, such as self esteem and anger management.”

The 12-step program encourages the women to attend a church. Each morning, the women must take part in a prayer/meditation.

One resident, who wishes to remain anonymous, said The Rose Home has changed her life. The woman has been at the home for two months. Arrested for possession of heroin, the mother of three said she was looking for a long-term residential treatment program when she found out about Rose Home. The woman said she now has a new lease on life and feels good about her future.

“I could not be happier,” she said. “I’m so thankful I came here.”

Each woman has a case manager. The women are required to pay rent, work a full-time job, stick to a budget, exercise and eat and cook healthy meals. They also must submit to frequent drug testing. So far, two women have graduated from the program this year and 20 women have completed the program since the home opened.

The women are required to verbally commit to at least six months. Yet, it typically takes seven to 12 months to complete the program.

The Rose Home is operated using grants, United Way funding, and funds from the Kosciusko County Community Foundation and the Harkless Foundation, as well as donations from private individuals, businesses and churches. Monetary donations are always appreciated, as are food, clothing, personal hygiene items and even volunteers.

“We are in the middle of putting a new septic in because ours is not working properly and is outdated,” said Blackshire. “Recently, we were approved for monies from the Elkhart County Department of Storm Water Management Board but still need contributions for the job, with a little less than half to pay for yet. We do have a deadline of this spring to complete this job.”

Residential scholarships are available for the first two weeks.

For more information or to make a donation, call (574) 457-4408.

  • clblackshire99

    Thank You for sharing this